Ugo Cei Photography https://www.ucphoto.me Welcome to the blog of Ugo Cei, a landscape and travel fine art photographer from Italy Thu, 17 Aug 2017 22:00:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 A quasi-random, unscheduled, very much experimental podcast about photography. I will post an episode whenever I feel like I have something to say. This is meant to be a complement to my website https://ucphoto.me for those who would rather listen than read. Ugo Cei clean Ugo Cei ugo.cei@gmail.com ugo.cei@gmail.com (Ugo Cei) Copyright © Ugo Cei 2017 Random Musings About The Art And Business Of Photography Ugo Cei Photography https://www.ucphoto.me/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/UGO-CEI-PHOTOGRAPHY-PODCAST.jpg https://www.ucphoto.me 112613498 Think Like a Magazine Editor https://www.ucphoto.me/b/think-like-magazine-editor/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/think-like-magazine-editor/#respond Tue, 15 Aug 2017 06:00:54 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6969 Magazine editors want to see a story develop through pictures. I think a little example here will serve well to illustrate the concept. You can also take this as an exercise and do it on the next occasion. Imagine you are commissioned to shoot photographs to illustrate a story about a restaurant that has recently become popular or has received ...

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Magazine editors want to see a story develop through pictures. I think a little example here will serve well to illustrate the concept. You can also take this as an exercise and do it on the next occasion.

Imagine you are commissioned to shoot photographs to illustrate a story about a restaurant that has recently become popular or has received some prestigious award. Now think, rather literally, about the story of a person going out to dinner in that restaurant.

You could start with a photo of the restaurant’s front from across the street, as if you were approaching it. This is what is called an establishing shot and could be used in a two-page spread to open the article.

Then you get closer and start noticing some details, like the restaurant’s name on the door or the menu posted outside.

Going inside, you get a glimpse of the hall, with people having dinner at their tables. Another establishing shot.

The maître d’ approaches you with a smile to greet the guests. You take a photo of him.

During the dinner, you take various photos of the dishes and of the wines.

Afterwards, you ask to see the kitchen and compliment the chef. You take some portraits of him in his kitchen (a series of environmental portraits) and some close-ups of his hands preparing food. A wide shot of the kitchen with the cooks at work would also be nice to have.

Congratulations, what you just did is telling the story of your dinner in pictures!

Here’s a couple more tips to guide you:

  • Constantly alternate between going wide to show context and getting close to focus on details.
  • Shoot all subjects in portrait and landscape orientation. You never know how the magazine will want to arrange your photos on a page.
  • Shoot a lot, but always intentionally, never randomly.
  • One or two wide shots are enough, maybe add a few more medium shots, but it’s the small details that make all the difference.

With thanks to Valérie Jardin for creative input.

Subscribe on iTunes.

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https://www.ucphoto.me/b/think-like-magazine-editor/feed/ 0 Magazine editors want to see a story develop through pictures. I think a little example here will serve well to illustrate the concept. You can also take this as an exercise and do it on the next occasion. Imagine you are commissioned to shoot photogra... Imagine you are commissioned to shoot photographs to illustrate a story about a restaurant that has recently become popular or has received some prestigious award. Now think, rather literally, about the story of a person going out to dinner in that restaurant.
You could start with a photo of the restaurant’s front from across the street, as if you were approaching it. This is what is called an establishing shot and could be used in a two-page spread to open the article.

Then you get closer and start noticing some details, like the restaurant’s name on the door or the menu posted outside.


Going inside, you get a glimpse of the hall, with people having dinner at their tables. Another establishing shot.


The maître d’ approaches you with a smile to greet the guests. You take a photo of him.

During the dinner, you take various photos of the dishes and of the wines.


Afterwards, you ask to see the kitchen and compliment the chef. You take some portraits of him in his kitchen (a series of environmental portraits) and some close-ups of his hands preparing food. A wide shot of the kitchen with the cooks at work would also be nice to have.

Congratulations, what you just did is telling the story of your dinner in pictures!
Here’s a couple more tips to guide you:

* Constantly alternate between going wide to show context and getting close to focus on details.
* Shoot all subjects in portrait and landscape orientation. You never know how the magazine will want to arrange your photos on a page.
* Shoot a lot, but always intentionally, never randomly.
* One or two wide shots are enough, maybe add a few more medium shots, but it’s the small details that make all the difference.

With thanks to Valérie Jardin for creative input.
Subscribe on iTunes.

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Ugo Cei clean 5:51 6969
A Monk’s Life: a Day in the Life of Buddhist Monks in Myanmar https://www.ucphoto.me/b/monks-life-day-life-buddhist-monks-myanmar/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/monks-life-day-life-buddhist-monks-myanmar/#respond Sun, 13 Aug 2017 09:28:29 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6938 by Gabriele Rodriquez The typical day of a Buddhist monk, whether young or adult, follows a fixed schedule: wake-up call at 4:30 am (including Saturdays and Sundays); one-hour gathering in the temple to recite mantras; personal hygiene in one of the several fountains scattered around the monastery (there are no showers but they wash themselves with the help of some buckets); ...

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by Gabriele Rodriquez

The typical day of a Buddhist monk, whether young or adult, follows a fixed schedule: wake-up call at 4:30 am (including Saturdays and Sundays); one-hour gathering in the temple to recite mantras; personal hygiene in one of the several fountains scattered around the monastery (there are no showers but they wash themselves with the help of some buckets); at 6.30 everyone stands neatly in a row in front of the gate; once they leave, monks have to go barefoot through the adjacent village to ask for of alms of food and money.

Return to the monastery at 7.30 am; breakfast with whatever was collected in the village (who has received more gives it to others); at 8.30 am school for the novices until 11.30 am, when the second and only meal of the day is served. At the end, every monk eats only two times a day and from 11.30 am onwards he can not touch food until the next day’s breakfast. At 1.30 PM school resumes until 5.30 PM, when everyone meets in the temple to pray the Buddha and by 7 PM they are all in bed.

Each monk is supplied with a wine-colored tunic coat, a lacquer bowl for alms, a razor to cut hair, a piece of soap, and a pair of flip-flops.

As you can see, the life of a Buddhist monk does not does not include much leisure, but he is always smiling and sunny. Most of them are orphans or have been sent to the monastery by parents who are so poor that they are not able to give them a daily meal and an education.

In some of the biggest monasteries preparation of food is provided by volunteers.

The novices, the little samanera.

This term (samaneri being the feminine form) identifies the novice who observes the ten precepts and is looking forward to the acceptance in the community (sangha) of monks (bhikkhu) or nuns (bhikkhuni).

The ceremony confirming the samanera’s intention to abandon secular life to join the monastic community is called pabbajja, usually translated as “to go forth” in the sense of moving from home life to a homeless life. This is due to the fact that, in the canon a Buddhist monk is often called an anagarika, a homeless (from a(n) – a prefix of negation, and agarija, a man of the house).

The samanera may remain in this state indefinitely or until full acceptance in the monastic community, which is accessed not before the age of 20, and which is formally sanctioned with a ceremony called upasampada or until return to the secular state. The latter is marked by the pledge to follow the five precepts of the lay practitioner, recited in front of the monastic community that accepted him or her as a novice.

All images were shot in Bagan and Mandalay, Myanmar (Burma) with the Fujifilm GFX-50S  (loaned courtesy of International Foto Center of Bussolengo) and the Fujifilm X-Pro2.

About the Author

Gabriele RodriquezGabriele Rodriquez was born in Verona, Italy, where he still lives together with his wife and their three children. Teacher of business courses until 1997, he practices as a tax advisor since 1990. On loan to photography since 1977, this has become an activity that gradually proved more than a passion, more than just a hobby. Photography has probably filled an area of his life that the cultural studies pursued have skimmed. In the course of his career he has earned 52 awards in various contests, including 2 international awards, has held individual and collective exhibitions, and has been a speaker at various events. He is a lover of reportage and travel photography and regularly publishes his works on Issuu.

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Across the Mojave: Las Vegas to San Diego https://www.ucphoto.me/b/across-mojave-las-vegas-san-diego/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/across-mojave-las-vegas-san-diego/#respond Wed, 09 Aug 2017 22:44:42 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6818 by Bob McCormac Las Vegas is usually a final destination for most people landing at McCarran International Airport. While it’s worth a couple days to take in the glitz of Las Vegas, the approximately 335-mile drive through the Mojave Desert to San Diego is really a segue that should not be missed. The Mojave Desert is almost 48,000 square miles ...

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by Bob McCormac

Las Vegas is usually a final destination for most people landing at McCarran International Airport. While it’s worth a couple days to take in the glitz of Las Vegas, the approximately 335-mile drive through the Mojave Desert to San Diego is really a segue that should not be missed.

The Mojave Desert is almost 48,000 square miles in area and takes its name from the Mojave Tribe that roamed this expanse from early times.  The Mojave also contains the lowest point in the United States, Death Valley at 279 feet below sea level.  Additionally, there are many points in the Mojave considered “high desert” (2000 feet and above).  The highest point is Charleston Peak at 11,219 feet. There’s not a lot vegetation in the Mojave with the Joshua being the dominant and most distinctive of what you will see on your way.

If you make the trip across the Mojave, make an early start as temperatures can rise quickly in the desert making for an uncomfortable trip that will take at least five hours.  Temperatures can range from 15 – 120 Fahrenheit with the highest recorded temperature of 134 Fahrenheit at Furnace Creek in Death Valley.

Hop on Interstate 15 out of Las Vegas and just keep driving!  The early part of the drive shows Las Vegas’ extended influence including Primm, Nevada.  Primm has a couple casinos, hotels, shopping outlets and other attractions and is the final stop before crossing into California.

Moon setting behind the mountains early in the morning

Moon setting behind the mountains early in the morning

The drive along I-15 is interesting especially for anyone that loves nature.  As the road winds through the desert, a short 20 minutes of driving can bring dramatic changes in scenery.

Rising sun illuminating the valley floor of the Mojave

Rising sun illuminating the valley floor of the Mojave

Another good reason to start out early on your trip is to make sure you catch the sun rising over the mountain tops in the desert.  It’s an unbelievable sight that can be seen comfortably from one of the few rest areas along I-15.

In the Mojave

In the Mojave

Even as the sun is rising over the mountains, the moon takes its time receding from your sight and can often be seen in full daylight against the majestic landscape.

Moon in the Sky

Moon in the Sky

If you’re of the mind to extend your trip a bit, there are several cities in California along the way that might entice you to stop, including: Barstow, Victorville, San Bernardino, Riverside, and Escondido.  If you’re interested in a longer side trip, Big Bear Lake east of San Bernardino is a worthy excursion.

Continuing on, I-15 turns into I-215 and back again to I-15 which runs straight into San Diego.  San Diego has a huge US Navy presence for the Pacific fleet, so some areas will be off limits unless you are with an active or retired naval personnel which fortunately we were during this trip.

Be patient while driving in around San Diego as the auto traffic can be quite heavy at any time of day. If you have a particular place you’re intending to stop be sure to map it out ahead of time so you know what Interstate exit you will getting off.

One of the most picturesque areas of San Diego is La Jolla Cove. La Jolla is a town within San Diego’s city limits to the north that has about seven miles of rocky coastline that draws hundreds of visitors daily for its expansive views and the wildlife that inhabits the coast.

Waves crashing at La Jolla Cove

Waves crashing at La Jolla Cove

Be sure to spend time enjoying the wildlife while at La Jolla Cove

Seals sunning themselves on one of the many rocks

Seals sunning themselves on one of the many rocks

Pelicans waiting for their next meal

Pelicans waiting for their next meal

If you are fortunate enough to be able to access the North Beach area in San Diego, the views can keep you mesmerized for hours.

Looking up North Beach toward the Del Coronado Hotel in the distance

Lifeguard Box on North Beach

Lifeguard Box on North Beach

Point Loma at sunset seen from North Beach

Point Loma at sunset seen from North Beach

There’s a lot to see on the drive from Las Vegas to San Diego and you can easily stretch your trip to 10 or more hours if you so choose with stops in the desert and side trips to some cities along the way.  Enjoy it!

About the Author

Bob McCormacBob McCormac is primarily a landscape and travel photographer from New Jersey in the USA.  Bob spent forty years as an information technology professional before deciding to pursue a long held passion for photography. Bob considers his style as simple and direct; trying not to over complicate the shot while still conveying the feeling.

You can follow Bob at his portfolio site, MAC Photography and on Facebook.

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Leading Scott Kelby’s World Wide Photo Walk in Milan https://www.ucphoto.me/b/leading-scott-kelbys-world-wide-photo-walk-milan/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/leading-scott-kelbys-world-wide-photo-walk-milan/#respond Tue, 08 Aug 2017 20:50:16 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6925 About five years ago, I attended one of Scott Kelby’s World Wide Photo Walks in Paris, lead by Scott himself. It was so much fun, even if we were under the rain for most of the time. Sine then, I have taken part in photo walks with some friends from Google+ in Berlin, England, Ireland, and Scotland, and with Trey ...

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About five years ago, I attended one of Scott Kelby’s World Wide Photo Walks in Paris, lead by Scott himself. It was so much fun, even if we were under the rain for most of the time. Sine then, I have taken part in photo walks with some friends from Google+ in Berlin, England, Ireland, and Scotland, and with Trey Ratcliff in Venice, Milan, and Berlin.

At this point I think I can say I’ve become quite the expert on photo walks, so I’ve decided to put my experience to good use, applied to lead one of Scott’s photo walks for the 10th anniversary edition and my application was accepted.

Therefore I will have the pleasure and the honour to be leading a tour of Milan on the morning of Saturday, Oct. 7th, 2017.

You can sign up by clicking here. The description is in Italian, but since I will be leading and I speak pretty good English, even anglophones are welcome and I will be there to assist them.

The photo walk is free, but it is limited to 50 participants, so hurry up if you don’t want to be left out. See you in Milan!

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How To Make The Most Of Photography Conferences https://www.ucphoto.me/b/make-photography-conferences/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/make-photography-conferences/#comments Sat, 05 Aug 2017 21:37:44 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6843 Photography conferences are great occasions to learn something, meet old friends and make new acquaintances, and get to visit new cities. Many photographers, however, often come home from a conference feeling they have missed something and haven’t made the most of their time there. These kinds of events can be expensive, so I think it pays off to prepare oneself ...

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Photography conferences are great occasions to learn something, meet old friends and make new acquaintances, and get to visit new cities.

Many photographers, however, often come home from a conference feeling they have missed something and haven’t made the most of their time there. These kinds of events can be expensive, so I think it pays off to prepare oneself so that attending a conference or a workshop doesn’t end up being a waste of time and money.

Here are some of my suggestions that I hope will be useful.

Zack Arias

Zack Arias

Get To Know Your Heroes

Don’t just go to a talk and listen passively. Introduce yourself, shake hands, compliment the speakers personally. Most speakers love it when attendees do these things, so don’t be shy and speak up. I have yet to see a photographer with a big diva complex.

Never Eat Alone

Lunches, dinners, and coffee breaks are great opportunities to meet new people. When going for lunch, scan the room to see at which tables there seems to be an interesting conversation going on or where are some of the people you want to meet. Never eat alone, always introduce yourself and, when going together with a group of buddies, don’t sit at the same table as your friends. You have the rest of the year to hang out with them. Make this all about making new friends.

Join As Many Social Activities As You Can

Attend as many dinners, parties, photowalk, birds-of-a-feather events, pub crawls as you can. Many valuable and interesting things happen at the edges and not inside the venue.

A karaoke party is a great opportunity to socialize

Always Follow Up

After you come home, if you collected business cards or email addresses, immediately write a short email, just to say Hi! or to thanks people for their time. Do not wait six months, or until you need something, before doing it.

The secret here is that 99% of the people will never do this. By following up, you are sure to stand out in a positive way.

What Items To Bring

Unless you have signed up for a specialized workshop, do not bring all of your gear. You will end up not using most of and being worried about its safety. Bring the smallest kit you can get away with, ideally one camera and one lens.

Of course, if you plan to attend a wildlife photography workshop, that 400mm f/4 lens might be useful, but only in some very special cases.

Levi Sim at Our Of Chicago

Levi Sim at Our Of Chicago

Favorite Photography Conferences

My favorite event, which I had the pleasure of being a speaker at for the first time in 2017, is the Out Of Chicago Summer Photography Conference. This is a small event that guarantees a level of camaraderie and intimacy that gets a bit lost at bigger events. Aside from the lectures, there are a lot of photowalks and workshops happening at all times in the streets of Chicago, so it’s absolutely impossible to get bored.

A few years ago, I learned a lot and had lots of fun attending one of the GPP Popup events. This one was in London, with Joe McNally, David Hobby, Zack Arias, and Gregory Heisler, all photographers that I admire a lot and being able to connect directly with them was such a great experience.

Gregory Heisler

Gregory Heisler

I have also asked a couple friends to tell me about their favorite photography conferences. Here are their opinions.

Valérie Jardin: FujiLove LIVE is the new kid on the block and with a very promising start! I had the honor to be one of the 4 speakers for its debut in NYC last February and it was a fantastic experience. A top notch team and an amazing audience made for an unforgettable weekend. I look forward to the next one!

Steve Simon: There are many great conferences out there and I really do enjoy them all. But one of my favorites is Gulf Photo Plus in Dubai. Why? Well I love going to Dubai, it’s a very different culture and environment from my normal and having been there a few times now, have really got to know the great people that have been organizing and growing it for years. (and I get to leave the snow for the hot sun) Like many conferences, there are awesome instructors which attract great students and since we all generally are staying in the same place–every night instructors and students get together over drinks to continue the conversations we started during the day.

How can you find local and international conferences to attend? A great tool to use is Eventbrite. In a few steps, they allow photographers to register directly online for many conferences and enable organizers to promote their events and also manage bookings.

Joe McNally

Joe McNally

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Two ways to photograph in the rain https://www.ucphoto.me/b/two-ways-photograph-rain/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/two-ways-photograph-rain/#respond Mon, 31 Jul 2017 06:00:27 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6636 by Simon Patterson Capturing the mood of the pouring rain in camera can be difficult. Standard auto or aperture-priority modes often miss the feel of a rainy day, and leave us with unsatisfactory flat looking images. I was recently caught out on the street in a sharp downpour with camera in hand so I decided to try two techniques to ...

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by Simon Patterson

Capturing the mood of the pouring rain in camera can be difficult. Standard auto or aperture-priority modes often miss the feel of a rainy day, and leave us with unsatisfactory flat looking images.

I was recently caught out on the street in a sharp downpour with camera in hand so I decided to try two techniques to capture the mood of the situation. I ducked under cover, lowered my camera to knee level, and faced the passers by who still braved the weather.

1. Fast shutter speed

My first effort to capture the rain was simple. I decided to “freeze” the raindrops as they were in mid air. Setting my camera to “Speed priority” mode (ie. S or Tv depending on one’s camera brand), I set my shutter speed to 1/1000 second. I selected auto-ISO and exposure compensation suitable for the lighting conditions at the time and waited for passers-by to approach. As they did, I held my camera steady and clicked away.

This resulted in hyper-real images of rain drops suspended in mid air around my subject. The images have a somewhat cluttered feel, with every drop taking the viewer’s attention. This slightly uncomfortable mood can be exactly what is experienced when we are caught in a downpour, so this technique can be very useful in communicating the rainy day feeling.

Fast shutter in the rain

Sony A6000, Sony 10-18mm f/4 lens @10mm, f/4, 1/1000 sec, auto-ISO selected ISO 5000

2. Slow shutter speed

Next I set my shutter speed to 1/30 second, leaving the other exposure settings as per the Fast Shutter Speed method above.

As people approached from the distance, I directed my camera’s focal point at them and physically moved my camera to match their speed of movement. As I followed them with my camera, I continually pressed my shutter button.

After some practice, this technique kept the subject’s body and face reasonably sharp, whilst adding a motion blur to the background. Meanwhile, the raindrops showed up as streaks of water, showing that the rain is falling.

This resulted in slightly surreal images, with a strong emphasis on the picture’s subject. Whilst this technique may convey a less uncomfortable mood than the first method, it can also look more contrived or manipulated. This method also has the advantage of using low ISO values, so the overall image quality can be better.

Slow shutter in the rain

Sony a6000, Sony 10-18 f/4 lens @ 10mm, f/5.6, 1/30 second, auto-ISO selected ISO 100

Conclusion

Both the fast-shutter method and the slow-shutter method can be effective at capturing rain in-camera. Neither result in “realistic” images as most people see a rainy scene with their eyes. But both methods can convey a particular mood, to be used depending on the photographer’s intentions.

Which method attracts you more? And what other techniques do you use to capture the feel of rainy days?

About the Author

Simon PattersonSimon Patterson is an enthusiastic photographer who also likes discovering the truth about things. He loves hiking and camping in the wilderness and the challenge of learning to communicate through the art of photography. Simon aims to create images that affect people emotionally. When not out shooting or processing images, he reads everything he can about photography. Simon resides in country Victoria, Australia.


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Talent is Overrated. A Conversation with Fabrizia Costa https://www.ucphoto.me/b/talent-overrated-conversation-fabrizia-costa/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/talent-overrated-conversation-fabrizia-costa/#respond Wed, 19 Jul 2017 20:53:34 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6791 Subscribe on iTunes. The subject of today’s podcast is a little pet-peeve of mine, the myth of talent, something about which I already ranted in the past. This topic was brought to my mind again by reading a blog post by my friend Fabrizia Costa. Fabrizia mentions that someone left her a comment saying basically that talent is necessary to ...

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Subscribe on iTunes.

The subject of today’s podcast is a little pet-peeve of mine, the myth of talent, something about which I already ranted in the past. This topic was brought to my mind again by reading a blog post by my friend Fabrizia Costa.

Fabrizia mentions that someone left her a comment saying basically that talent is necessary to get anywhere in photography and her reply is as follows:

“This is the view held by many photographers, and to some extent it’s true but I believe that talent is overrated. Yes, you do need something special to be exceptional, there’s no doubt about that, but you don’t need that to be a success in this world.

We all have some talent, every single one of us, and the issue here is that many have not yet found out what their talent is and how to use it. In reality, hidden talent will emerge when we get down to work, take action, commit, learn, train, and put hours into it.

They say that if you do something for 10,000 hours you become an expert. And that’s probably true, in terms of learning a skill and gaining specific knowledge about something, but that’s only about 50% of what we need to succeed in our business. The other 50% is what goes on in your head, what you believe you can and cannot do, and being open to receive. We’re so bad at receiving, we self-sabotage a lot. Negative talk in our heads will undermine all the work we do, but if we do the work and keep those voices down, there’s really no limit to what we can achieve.

We all know wonderful talented people who are struggling to make ends meet, or who can’t make a living out of their art and have to work a 9-5 job to survive. So is talent the defining factor? It’s quite clearly not the case!

Success is not just for the talented, it’s for everyone who’s willing to step further and put themselves out there and dare to be great. Your talent will emerge, grow and shine as you do the work, but your ability to generate wealth, or whatever your idea of success may be, lies much deeper than what you’re good at doing.

Whether you feel you’re talented or not, be aware it’s not the deciding factor in a successful business and life. Some even use that as an excuse to hold back! For years I didn’t even try to do things that I wanted to do because I kept saying I’m not good at them. And while I may still not be very good at them now (you don’t want to hear me sing), if I invested time and I trained with a teacher I would definitely become better… and eventually maybe even good!”

So, as this is an issue about which I am passionate, I picked up the phone to call Fabrizia and ask her a few more questions about it. You can listen to the recording of our conversation above, or read the transcript below. If you do, I would love to hear your feedback. Please leave a comment here, no matter if you agree with us or if you think we are completely nuts!

Ugo: The other day you wrote a beautiful post on your Facebook group “Outside the Box”, titled “Talent is overrated”. Your words immediately resonated with me. A few years ago I wrote a post on my blog titled “The Myth of Talent” and I swear you could have written mine and I could have written yours. What prompted you to write that post?

Fabrizia: Well the day before it was actually the day of the ladies’ final at Wimbledon so I wrote a post about crucial moments. Really it was about a tennis match: sometimes there is a ball that is a really important ball and it’s worth a lot more than just that point. Because from that point on, if you get it, you could win; if you lose it, you could fall apart. That’s exactly what happened to Serena Williams: she lost two balls and that was the end of the match. She lost the match, after that she fell apart. But this happens so much in tennis. And it made me think that in business we also have a lot of opportunities where we can take a risk or we don’t take the risk and if we take risks we have a chance of winning big things. And some people just don’t do it and we lose some crucial moments that can take us ahead.

And then there was a comment on that, somebody saying: “Yeah that’s all good and well but you need talent to go further in photography.” And so that made me think that’s the way a lot of people think. But to me talent is overrated. And so that’s why I wrote the post because, like you said in your own post, it’s a myth that you need talent to get anywhere in in photography and in business. There was then a comment on this post saying: “To be out of this world, you need a lot of talent.” Yes. But we’re not talking about being Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg.

We’re talking about running a successful business. You don’t have to be exceptional to do that. You can do the work and get where you need to be and be very successful. There’s a ton of people that make a lot of money have great successful businesses and you don’t know who they are. They’re not famous but they do it right. So that’s why I post that. It’s a bit of a long story.

U: It’s really true. I completely agree. But every time I mention this topic, I am amazed at the amount of negative reactions I get. It compares to backlash I get when I say the Golden Section is a myth. It looks like people are really fond of the notion that you have to have innate talent to succeed, even though they cannot justify in any other way than by saying it is self-evident. Why do you think it’s so?

F: Absolutely. And this opens up a whole big can of worms because it’s an easy way to justify your lack of success. So it’s very easy to say “I don’t have enough talent and therefore I cannot be successful” or “it’s not working for me because I don’t have much talent as a photographer. I’m not good enough.” That’s what it means: “I’m not good enough.” And that goes back into the whole issue of self value which is a huge thing and it’s at the bottom of all this argument, because that is everybody’s problem. Lack of self value and what we believe we cannot do because we’re not good enough. It will affect our communication, our connection with clients, our prices that we set, the products that we offer, the way we run our business, the way we do not really believe that we can do it and therefore we’re not going to do it right.

So the value that we place on our work and the value that we place on ourselves is really the core issue. I think it goes down to that. The superficial comment is: “Oh, you need talent.”. In fact the the self-value and all that kind of stuff is really big in the work that nobody wants to do because you need to get down there and you really need to think and you really need to work on yourself and realize the value that you got and bring it out. And that is a different kind of a work and I end up doing this with pretty much every single one of the people that I coach because we always go and we always get to a point when this thing comes out.

So it’s easy to blame it on the lack of talent. In reality it is people not really wanting to deal with their issues and self-worth. And I think that’s what’s come up.

U: I love that we basically reached the same conclusions, but maybe coming from different directions, because my conviction that a talent is largely a myth was inspired by my mentor, Robin Griggs Wood. She said she had missed a lot of opportunities in her life because of the blocks that other people put in her way. They didn’t think enough of her. They didn’t give her opportunities and space and the training to reach her true potential. And the fact that people discount other people because they think they don’t have talent makes her sad. She’s fighting against that. You seem to come from a different direction, where you see the blocks that people themselves put in front of their own path. So not so much the blocks that others put, but I think that these are equally important, equally heavy to lift if not even more so. It’s great that we we see we see the same effect, but coming from different directions.

F: I think there are things that people put in our way and it’s mainly in our childhood and our self value is built up when we are children and teenagers and those are the crucial years. So if we’ve had parents or teachers or figures of authority in our lives that have put us down, we don’t think much or value us, then that’s certainly something that people put in our way, that blocks. Somebody keeps telling you: “You can’t sing, you can’t sing. You know you’re out of tune.” A child will not be listening to music and will not be trying to sing and will not be learning to sing and will be out of tune. It’s just the way it works. If somebody is encouraged to do something, even if they’re mediocre they will become better.

And that’s just the way it works. So there are things that people put in our way, especially when we’re younger, but I think in the end those are the voices in our heads that, even when our parents are gone and all those people are gone, we keep listening to. We replay these and these are all our choice. It’s our own subconscious that keeps telling us the same stuff 10, 20, 30 years later and it’s not the truth. So in a way we are putting that stuff in our way and we use these things as an excuse because to overcome that we need to face it, to face the fact that is not true and that we need to get over ourselves. And it’s a whole lot of work and it can be painful and it can be challenging. And so a lot of people don’t really want to do it. Instead they complain about the lack of talent and just hide.

U: According to you how can people help themselves remove those blocks?

F: Well it’s facing it and realizing that once you see something, like I say in Outside the Box, once you see something you can’t unsee it. Some people get a therapist, some people get a coach. A lot of people work with me and that’s what we do. And some people do self-therapy, journaling and trying to work out what goes on in the head. There’s many ways to remove blocks.

The first thing you do is identify that you have blocks and realize that you have these things and that you’re using some things as excuses not to, because it’s down to fear. You fear showing up. That’s another thing: you need to show up and it’s fearful. Once you’re out there, people are gonna judge you and people don’t like to be judged. And so it’s easier to say I don’t have enough talent to show up and just stay in your own little thing and be a victim and never be successful and complain. But it’s never your fault, it’s because you don’t have talent.

U: Absolutely. I think we could have a long academic discussion and science papers about the relative weight of nurture versus culture and what is in our genes and so on. Of course, if you’re not seven feet tall you can be an NBA center, but aside from those very specific cases, if I can interpret also your your words, what we’re pointing out here is that you should not think that you don’t have talent and therefore something is precluded to you. That you will never be able to reach certain goals, most reasonable ones at least. I cannot pretend to be Roger Federer. At least I could play decent tennis if in my youth I really wanted to do it. Every time somebody says they have no talent for this or that or that somebody else doesn’t have any talent and we don’t amount to much, we should always be ready to point out that it’s a load of crap.

F: I don’t like to discount that as a superficial thing, but anybody can succeed in business, because even people that are not incredibly intelligent have succeeded in business and have run good photography businesses for many years. So there’s no reason why anyone shouldn’t do it. It’s just the fact that you have to believe in what you’re doing and you need to do it hundred percent and put the time and the effort in. But most of all believe it, as if you don’t believe it you’re not going to get it.

U: You mentioned the coaching that you do. Can you just tell my audience how people can find more about your coaching activities, should they want to benefit from them?

F: Yes. I don’t I don’t teach photography so I keep myself out of that because it’s not photographers’ teaching. I teach photography to amateurs locally but I don’t do workshops of photography that much. But I do coach for business and I coach professional photographers only because it’s about business obviously. So I have the group on Facebook called Outside the Box Evolution, one in English one in Italian,so you can go see it and find that. And I run workshops. It’s two-day workshops in different cities. The next one is in Vienna in October and I’m just about to launch an online mastermind group just for 10 photographers who work with me for three to six months. And then I do one-to-one coaching, so there’s different options and journeys that we could do together. I don’t take on many people because I am a photographer and I still work as a photographer and I don’t want to give that up because that’s what I love. I love to do both things. I’m running two jobs at the same time. I couldn’t choose one over the other. Yeah that’s what I do.

The post Talent is Overrated. A Conversation with Fabrizia Costa appeared first on Ugo Cei Photography.

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https://www.ucphoto.me/b/talent-overrated-conversation-fabrizia-costa/feed/ 0 Subscribe on iTunes. The subject of today’s podcast is a little pet-peeve of mine, the myth of talent, something about which I already ranted in the past. This topic was brought to my mind again by reading a blog post by my friend Fabrizia Costa. Subscribe on iTunes.
The subject of today’s podcast is a little pet-peeve of mine, the myth of talent, something about which I already ranted in the past. This topic was brought to my mind again by reading a blog post by my friend Fabrizia Costa.
Fabrizia mentions that someone left her a comment saying basically that talent is necessary to get anywhere in photography and her reply is as follows:
“This is the view held by many photographers, and to some extent it’s true but I believe that talent is overrated. Yes, you do need something special to be exceptional, there’s no doubt about that, but you don’t need that to be a success in this world.
We all have some talent, every single one of us, and the issue here is that many have not yet found out what their talent is and how to use it. In reality, hidden talent will emerge when we get down to work, take action, commit, learn, train, and put hours into it.
They say that if you do something for 10,000 hours you become an expert. And that’s probably true, in terms of learning a skill and gaining specific knowledge about something, but that’s only about 50% of what we need to succeed in our business. The other 50% is what goes on in your head, what you believe you can and cannot do, and being open to receive. We’re so bad at receiving, we self-sabotage a lot. Negative talk in our heads will undermine all the work we do, but if we do the work and keep those voices down, there’s really no limit to what we can achieve.
We all know wonderful talented people who are struggling to make ends meet, or who can’t make a living out of their art and have to work a 9-5 job to survive. So is talent the defining factor? It’s quite clearly not the case!
Success is not just for the talented, it’s for everyone who’s willing to step further and put themselves out there and dare to be great. Your talent will emerge, grow and shine as you do the work, but your ability to generate wealth, or whatever your idea of success may be, lies much deeper than what you’re good at doing.
Whether you feel you’re talented or not, be aware it’s not the deciding factor in a successful business and life. Some even use that as an excuse to hold back! For years I didn’t even try to do things that I wanted to do because I kept saying I’m not good at them. And while I may still not be very good at them now (you don’t want to hear me sing), if I invested time and I trained with a teacher I would definitely become better… and eventually maybe even good!”
So, as this is an issue about which I am passionate, I picked up the phone to call Fabrizia and ask her a few more questions about it. You can listen to the recording of our conversation above, or read the transcript below. If you do, I would love to hear your feedback. Please leave a comment here, no matter if you agree with us or if you think we are completely nuts!
Ugo: The other day you wrote a beautiful post on your Facebook group “Outside the Box”, titled “Talent is overrated”. Your words immediately resonated with me. A few years ago I wrote a post on my blog titled “The Myth of Talent” and I swear you could have written mine and I could have written yours. What prompted you to write that post?
Fabrizia: Well the day before it was actually the day of the ladies’ final at Wimbledon so I wrote a post about crucial moments. Really it was about a tennis match: sometimes there is a ball that is a really important ball and it’s worth a lot more than just that point. Because from that point on, if you get it, you could win; if you lose it, you could fall apart.]]>
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Photography : A Deadly Undertaking https://www.ucphoto.me/b/photography-deadly-undertaking/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/photography-deadly-undertaking/#respond Fri, 14 Jul 2017 10:46:32 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6638 by Simon Patterson It can be a dangerous world out there for photographers. Whether we’re trying to find that perfect angle or capture the decisive moment, sometimes photography can be deadly. And not only for people who take crazy risks for their images, as we shall see later on. But first, the paparazzi are one type of photographer that many people love ...

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by Simon Patterson

It can be a dangerous world out there for photographers. Whether we’re trying to find that perfect angle or capture the decisive moment, sometimes photography can be deadly. And not only for people who take crazy risks for their images, as we shall see later on.

But first, the paparazzi are one type of photographer that many people love to hate. Freelance photographer Chris Guerra was following Justin Bieber’s Ferrari when the sports car was pulled over by the police for speeding. As Chris approached, trying to take photos, the police told him to return to his own vehicle. After some persuasion, Chris did walk back to his car, when he was struck by an oncoming SUV and killed. Ironically, Justin Bieber was not driving his Ferrari at the time, so Chris wouldn’t even have nailed the shot before his untimely demise.

Then there’s the “Darwin Award” type photographers. People who photograph on operational train tracks could fit into this category, such as John DeReggi from Boyds, Maryland, USA. It seems that John, aged 16, was photographing a friend on the railway tracks for a school assignment when an Amtrak train struck and killed him. The friend saw the train and successfully dived one way, but John tried to go the other way, to no avail. Active train tracks are particularly risky places to shoot because oncoming trains are not easily heard until they are upon you. The train that killed John reportedly travelled at 110 mph (180 km/h) which would have left him almost no time to react.

Dangerous railway tracks photo? Sandaoling Coal Mine, China

Dangerous? Crazy? This coal train was actually travelling in reverse, but taking this shot whilst standing on the railway tracks would still be considered too risky by some. Sandaoling Coal Mine, China

It isn’t just children who die being silly on railway tracks. Photographer Christopher O’Guinn, aged 25, was doing a model shoot between two sets of railway tracks in Fresno, California, USA, when trains arrived on both lines at once. The trains were travelling in opposite directions which would have given him little chance to avoid being killed. Except, of course, if he wasn’t at the railway tracks in the first place.

A special Darwin Award category could probably be made just for crazy selfies. Leornad Tonui and Michael Shikuku were reportedly in Kenya taking a selfie whilst standing next to and touching a wild elephant. Unsurprisingly, they received decisive retribution from the camera-shy elephant who squashed them, killing them both.

A Polish couple also tragically died trying to take a selfie after stepping over a safety barrier at the ocean cliffs in Cabo da Roca, Portugal. Climbing the barrier in front of their young children, the couple slipped and plunged to their deaths. I can’t imagine the trauma faced by their children, who had to be placed in temporary care before relatives could travel to Portugal to collect them.

Wild elephant up close

Wild elephants are beautiful, but standing next to one for a selfie is a guaranteed Darwin Award. This wild elephant was standing at the side of a highway, not within a national park, in Botswana, Africa.

We’ve all heard of photojournalists who have died in far off places. In January 2016, photographer Leila Alaoui was killed by a jihadi gunman in Burkina Faso, Africa, during a terrorist attack. Leila was sitting in a car outside a cafe when she was shot multiple times along with her local driver. Thirty victims ultimately died in the terrorist attack, which was targeted at a hotel very close to Leila’s car. Burkina Faso is one of the world’s poorest nations and has been subject to multiple coups in recent years, so Leila was possibly taking an above average risk by being there. Her death is still incredibly unfortunate and tragic.

Rooftop climbers are also well known photography risk takers, sometimes receiving instant capital punishment for the crime of trespassing on skyscrapers. Connor Cummings of New Jersey, USA is one example. Connor had successfully reached the top of New York’s 52 story Four Seasons Hotel and was photographing the scene below when he stepped back and fell through an opening in a catwalk ladder. Although he was approximately 680 feet (210 metres) above street level, he actually only fell 25 feet (7.5 metres) to a rooftop below. Unfortunately, this drop was still enough to kill him.

“Do not go beyond this point it is slippery”. Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe.

“Do not go beyond this point it is slippery”. Overlooking a 100 metre (330 feet) drop at Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, sometimes the lure of a better view is too tempting.

Photographer Richard Green was killed in a helicopter crash along with his wife Carolyn and filmmaker John Davis as they attempted to fly over densely vegetated mountainous terrain near Sydney, Australia. Richard’s love of “helicamping” enabled him to fly to the most remote and inaccessible places to photograph creatures and scenes rarely seen by humans. Richard was reportedly known as a risk taker in his helicopter, and this time he paid the ultimate price for it.

It’s not just Darwin Award winners and photographers at insane locations who die in the pursuit of photography. Father-and-son duo Chris and Brendan Powell, in Brisbane Australia, were making aerial photos from a large cherry picker when it toppled over and crashed onto a nearby street. The cherry picker was up to 40 metres (120 feet) tall and its collapse killed Chris and injured his 17 year old son. Reportedly “vigilant about safety and blameless for the accident”, Chris Powell’s death serves as a reminder that all aerial photography requires extra precautions, even if you’re not flying.

Mt Cook, NZ helicopter ride

Every now and again, a helicopter crashes. Too much risk? Not this time, thankfully. Mt Cook, New Zealand.

Other experienced photographers have also taken things one step too far at their peril. John McCourt from the Antrim Camera Club, Northern Ireland, died trying to photograph stormy weather in Co Donegal, UK. John slipped off a cliff into a wave-battered ravine, an experience local coastguards described as “would have been like a washing machine”. Sometimes the best landscape images are made in the most dramatic weather, but this photographer’s misjudgment of the conditions cost him his life.

Limestone cliff edge

The limestone cliff edge is very unstable and the ground is slippery, but the shapes and colours of this location are appealing at sunset. How much closer to the edge could we safely go? Windy Harbour, Western Australia

Every photographer so far was either doing something extraordinary or especially risky. Not so for Sarah Frazer, a photographer who had journeyed alone photographing third world countries, before heading home to her quiet Australian country town. Her car broke down relatively close to home, so she wisely pulled off to the side of the road, when she was struck by a truck. The truck driver was not alcohol or drug affected and had not been speeding. It appears he was simply momentarily distracted when his truck hit and killed Sarah. Sarah’s dad reportedly quoted her as having said “I’ve looked after myself travelling in Third World countries, you don’t need to worry about me, I’m only just going to Wagga”. How sad and unlucky that this proved not to be the case.

Gunbarrel Highway, Western Australia

What is the risk of driving a car to and from your photo shoot, compared to the other risks? Gunbarrel Highway, Western Australia

Photographer and TV cameraman Adam Ward, and journalist Alison Parker, were famously killed by a lone gunman whilst filming a live TV interview in Virginia, USA. The gunman was disgruntled after having been fired from the television station almost a year earlier, and he also had a history of interpersonal issues with colleagues. It seems that Adam was primarily a victim of simply working in the wrong job at the wrong place during the wrong time.

Finally, someone who didn’t die but got very close. Photographer Ian Parr of Esperance, Western Australia was standing on some rocks at his local beach, photographing the ocean, when a freak wave dragged him out to sea. Thankfully, after swimming to the point of exhaustion for nearly an hour, people came to the shore and heard Ian’s cries for help. Ian was rescued and revived, and lived to tell the tale. A lucky escape!

Freak wave?

There is the risk of being swept away by a freak wave whilst shooting at the ocean. Phillip Island, Victoria, Australia. Photo of the author courtesy David Wilkinson.

So what can we learn from all this? We already know that a worthwhile life involves risk, and the best photographs are taken because they portray something special, different or risky. To make the best of a scene, thousands of photographers have successfully flown in a helicopter, climbed past a fence or barrier, stepped off the marked path, or weathered a storm. Many photographers have captured an image whilst briefly standing just a little too close to busy traffic and some of us have even pressed the shutter button whilst uncomfortably close to a moving train. Many photographers have also photographed beside the ocean, always being susceptible to being swept out to sea by a freak wave. Most of us have worked with a prickly colleague. And we have all travelled by car, one of the activities in life that is possibly most likely to kill us.

But neither you nor I have died doing it….yet. So what level of risk do you think is acceptable to make the best pictures you can? It is worth considering this carefully, to hopefully avoid your friends and family reading your name in an article like this.

About the Author

Simon PattersonSimon Patterson is an enthusiastic photographer who also likes discovering the truth about things. He loves hiking and camping in the wilderness and the challenge of learning to communicate through the art of photography. Simon aims to create images that affect people emotionally. When not out shooting or processing images, he reads everything he can about photography. Simon resides in country Victoria, Australia.

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Embracing the Cliché https://www.ucphoto.me/b/podcast-ep-1-embracing-cliche/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/podcast-ep-1-embracing-cliche/#respond Tue, 11 Jul 2017 13:21:17 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6728 Subscribe on iTunes. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a cliché is “A phrase or opinion that is overused and betrays a lack of original thought.” Examples of usage include: ‘that old cliché ‘a woman’s place is in the home’ ‘the usual worn-out clichés about the English’ We can certainly apply this concept to visual arts as well, including photography. ...

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Subscribe on iTunes.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a cliché is

“A phrase or opinion that is overused and betrays a lack of original thought.”

Examples of usage include:

‘that old cliché ‘a woman’s place is in the home’

‘the usual worn-out clichés about the English’

We can certainly apply this concept to visual arts as well, including photography. Anyone of us can certainly think of photographs that have been taken so many times that they have become clichés: most photos taken at sunset at Horseshoe Bend in Arizona look exactly like every other one, don’t they?

This one below is a photo of mine, taken one night in Prague, and it shows the Vitava river with the perspective of bridges crossing it just as the sky was becoming darker and the city lights started to turn on. The so-called blue hour, my favorite time of day for shooting cityscapes.

Bridges across the Vitava River at night. Prague, Czechia.

Bridges across the Vitava River at night.

It’s a well-worn location, as the screenshot below of a Google Images search results page demonstrates. If you want to take the same photo, jump on one of the trams that go to Sparta, get off right in front of the stadium and cross the park, called Letna Park, on the opposite side of the road from the stadium. It’s pretty easy. Bring a telephoto lens because you’ll be far from the bridges.

Google Images screenshot

Sometimes, when I visit places for the first time and I have little time, I make a plan to capture at least a few iconic, postcard-type photos, if you will. In this case I only had two days to spend in Prague, the weather was horrible for the most part, so I tried at least to get a couple safe shots.

Now, there’s a reason why some images become clichés and that’s because they are beautiful. People love looking at them and love buying products that carry reproductions of those images, like for example jigsaw puzzles. The jigsaw puzzle industry might be the biggest consumer of colorful, detailed images of easily recognizable locations in great light, just like mine above.

Precisely because of these qualities, and not because of any great artistic merit, my photo has sold well, including to a jigsaw puzzle company that used it for one of their products. The proceedings from sales of this image might one day allow me to take another trip to Prague and other types of images at leisure.

Hinkler jigsaw puzzle Vltava River, Prague, Czech Republic

A jigsaw puzzle using my photo.

Here’s another, maybe less obvious example. The photo below is of a natural arch called the Azure Window, on the island of Gozo, in the Maltese archipelago. This was already very well-known as a photo location in the Mediterranean, but became even more popular after it was used as the backdrop for the scene of the wedding of Daenerys Targaryen and Khal Drogo in the Game of Thrones series. (Warning: graphical violence at the link).

The Azure Window, Gozo, Malta

The Azure Window, Gozo, Malta

This is maybe less of a cliché, thanks to the long exposure and the black-and-white treatment, but still it is not overly original. However, I am happy that I took this photo. I won’t be able to take it anymore, since the Azure Window is gone, collapsed into the sea after a winter storm.

Maltese newspaper page about the collapse of the Azure Window

Maltese newspaper

My point here is that sometimes a cliché photo might be the only lasting memory you have of a place, so why not take it?

With this I don’t want to suggest that you should only take iconic postcard shots. By all means, work towards developing your own style and finding your own vision, but there is nothing wrong with taking an occasional picture of too common a view and always remember, as director Jim Jarmusch says, that authenticity is invaluable, originality is non-existent.

“Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is nonexistent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery—celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.”

– Jim Jarmusch

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https://www.ucphoto.me/b/podcast-ep-1-embracing-cliche/feed/ 0 Subscribe on iTunes. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a cliché is “A phrase or opinion that is overused and betrays a lack of original thought.” Examples of usage include: ‘that old cliché ‘a woman’s place is in the home’ ‘the usual worn-out... Subscribe on iTunes.
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a cliché is
“A phrase or opinion that is overused and betrays a lack of original thought.”
Examples of usage include:
‘that old cliché ‘a woman’s place is in the home’
‘the usual worn-out clichés about the English’
We can certainly apply this concept to visual arts as well, including photography. Anyone of us can certainly think of photographs that have been taken so many times that they have become clichés: most photos taken at sunset at Horseshoe Bend in Arizona look exactly like every other one, don’t they?
This one below is a photo of mine, taken one night in Prague, and it shows the Vitava river with the perspective of bridges crossing it just as the sky was becoming darker and the city lights started to turn on. The so-called blue hour, my favorite time of day for shooting cityscapes.
It’s a well-worn location, as the screenshot below of a Google Images search results page demonstrates. If you want to take the same photo, jump on one of the trams that go to Sparta, get off right in front of the stadium and cross the park, called Letna Park, on the opposite side of the road from the stadium. It’s pretty easy. Bring a telephoto lens because you’ll be far from the bridges.

Sometimes, when I visit places for the first time and I have little time, I make a plan to capture at least a few iconic, postcard-type photos, if you will. In this case I only had two days to spend in Prague, the weather was horrible for the most part, so I tried at least to get a couple safe shots.
Now, there’s a reason why some images become clichés and that’s because they are beautiful. People love looking at them and love buying products that carry reproductions of those images, like for example jigsaw puzzles. The jigsaw puzzle industry might be the biggest consumer of colorful, detailed images of easily recognizable locations in great light, just like mine above.
Precisely because of these qualities, and not because of any great artistic merit, my photo has sold well, including to a jigsaw puzzle company that used it for one of their products. The proceedings from sales of this image might one day allow me to take another trip to Prague and other types of images at leisure.
Here’s another, maybe less obvious example. The photo below is of a natural arch called the Azure Window, on the island of Gozo, in the Maltese archipelago. This was already very well-known as a photo location in the Mediterranean, but became even more popular after it was used as the backdrop for the scene of the wedding of Daenerys Targaryen and Khal Drogo in the Game of Thrones series. (Warning: graphical violence at the link).
This is maybe less of a cliché, thanks to the long exposure and the black-and-white treatment, but still it is not overly original. However, I am happy that I took this photo. I won’t be able to take it anymore, since the Azure Window is gone, collapsed into the sea after a winter storm.
My point here is that sometimes a cliché photo might be the only lasting memory you have of a place, so why not take it?
With this I don’t want to suggest that you should only take iconic postcard shots. By all means, work towards developing your own style and finding your own vision, but there is nothing wrong with taking an occasional picture of too common a view and a...]]>
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Introducing the Ugo Cei Photography Podcast https://www.ucphoto.me/b/introducing-ugo-cei-photography-podcast/ https://www.ucphoto.me/b/introducing-ugo-cei-photography-podcast/#comments Mon, 10 Jul 2017 11:48:26 +0000 https://www.ucphoto.me/?p=6710 Welcome to my new photography podcast! I can already hear some of you say:  “Hey, wait a minute, don’t you already have a photography podcast?” Well, as a matter of fact I do. It’s called The Travelling Image Makers and I co-host that one with my buddy Ralph Velasco. Every week we publish an interview with a travel photographer and ...

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Welcome to my new photography podcast!

I can already hear some of you say:  “Hey, wait a minute, don’t you already have a photography podcast?”

Well, as a matter of fact I do. It’s called The Travelling Image Makers and I co-host that one with my buddy Ralph Velasco. Every week we publish an interview with a travel photographer and we’ve been doing so for more than 80 weeks. It’s a very high production value, very structured podcast and you can count on an episode to be published every week for the foreseeable future.

I am definitely not giving up on that, but I wanted something different. I wanted to be able to share something with my followers and my readers whenever I read something in the news, or something that tickles my fancy, or I publish a new article on my website or whenever I think I have something interesting to share.

So this is going to be very random and very experimental. I don’t plan to spend a lot of time producing and editing and it’s going to be recorded in one take and published immediately. I am not going to follow a fixed schedule; you will just be able to find all the episodes at this page and of course also on iTunes, where you will be able to subscribe, if you want to keep listening to what I have to say.

Topics covered will include everything that is photography-related with some extensions into travel, which is one of my favourite pastimes. I recently also started developing a keen interest on marketing, especially marketing for creative businesses, like mine, so if you are in my situation,  might be interested in what I have to say about this topic.

This is just the pilot episode, so no real news to share here. I will probably recording another episode tomorrow, where I will talk about the latest post I published on my website.

Stay tuned, all the fun is just about to start!

 

The post Introducing the Ugo Cei Photography Podcast appeared first on Ugo Cei Photography.

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https://www.ucphoto.me/b/introducing-ugo-cei-photography-podcast/feed/ 2 Welcome to my new photography podcast! I can already hear some of you say:  “Hey, wait a minute, don’t you already have a photography podcast?” Well, as a matter of fact I do. It’s called The Travelling Image Makers and I co-host that one with my buddy... I can already hear some of you say:  “Hey, wait a minute, don’t you already have a photography podcast?”
Well, as a matter of fact I do. It’s called The Travelling Image Makers and I co-host that one with my buddy Ralph Velasco. Every week we publish an interview with a travel photographer and we’ve been doing so for more than 80 weeks. It’s a very high production value, very structured podcast and you can count on an episode to be published every week for the foreseeable future.
I am definitely not giving up on that, but I wanted something different. I wanted to be able to share something with my followers and my readers whenever I read something in the news, or something that tickles my fancy, or I publish a new article on my website or whenever I think I have something interesting to share.
So this is going to be very random and very experimental. I don’t plan to spend a lot of time producing and editing and it’s going to be recorded in one take and published immediately. I am not going to follow a fixed schedule; you will just be able to find all the episodes at this page and of course also on iTunes, where you will be able to subscribe, if you want to keep listening to what I have to say.
Topics covered will include everything that is photography-related with some extensions into travel, which is one of my favourite pastimes. I recently also started developing a keen interest on marketing, especially marketing for creative businesses, like mine, so if you are in my situation,  might be interested in what I have to say about this topic.
This is just the pilot episode, so no real news to share here. I will probably recording another episode tomorrow, where I will talk about the latest post I published on my website.
Stay tuned, all the fun is just about to start!
 
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